California Fires


There is nothing anyone can do to change it, to stop it. We can fight it and the fire fighters do so with skill, daring, courage and a danger to themselves, but still it chews the dry brush into a soft ash.

Lightening starts most of them. The drought too hurts and so does an ill wind called Santa Ana. It flows quickly from the mountain tops and reminds us of our vulnerability. The tears of loss and smiles of safety on the same face parallel our conflict and appreciation of nature.

The stories of neighbor helping neighbor, confirm our desire for community. There are hundreds of stories not only of crushing flames and charred places, but stories of hopes and wishes, shattered dreams and shock.

In times of such destruction values change rapidly. The acquired stuff of daily living is no match for the loss of a treasured family picture or the ache of not knowing if a pet survived.

There is never a quick end to tragedy. No easy answers to the wailed questions of why and no relief when cries have run out of tears.

It is not possible to hold each hand of so many so hurting from these fires. All we can do, in this human family, is to be aware and to care. There is something powerful in that and it heals.

Things Are Not Alway As They Seem

There was this guy named Bartholomew Masterson. He was born on a farm in Quebec, Canada. He was also known as William Barclay. He was a respected journalist and a leading authority on boxing.

At one time in his life he was a deputy US Marshall for the southern district of New York, appointed by Teddy Roosevelt.

In other times he had other careers. He was a buffalo hunter, an army scout, a saloon owner, and a professional gambler.

Bartholomew or William Barclay went by the nickname of “Bat.” Bat Masterson, sheriff of Dodge City, friend of Wyatt Earp, Doc Holiday and Wild Bill Cody.

History tells us Masterson was a gun fighter. He may have had a couple of gunfights, but more correctly he knew a lot of legitimate gunfighters. Masterson’s friend and writer Alfred Henry Lewis wrote a book called the Sunset Trail, where he embellished Bat’s adventures with the famous gunfighters of the west and the legend increased. How many current urban legends are out there with little truth in their telling?

Bat Matereson died in New York City in 1921 from a heart attack while sitting at his desk. He was sports editor for the New York Morning Telegraph.

Things are not always as they seem.

Tristadecaphobia


Some thoughts tonight on fear of the number thirteen and the great seal of the United States.

We just passed a Friday the 13th and we just passed an anniversary of sorts. On June 20th, 1782 congress officially proclaimed and sanctioned the great seal.

There are some esoteric surprises about this symbol and the number 13 is purposely prominent.
Take out a dollar bill. Look at the back side. In the two circles you will find both the front and reverse side of the great seal.

Look at the eagle. In the left talon he holds 13 arrows. In the right talon, an olive branch. On it, 13 leaves and 13 berries. The ribbon in the eagles beak contains the Latin phrase “E Pluribus Unum”. Count the letters. Thirteen!

The other side of the seal show an unfinished pyramid. Count the steps. Thirteen. The inscription “Annuit Coeptis: also contains thirteen letters.

Given the great success of this country, perhaps thirteen is not unlucky by its nature.
Perhaps it responds to the energy we give it. Like so many things, our response to something or someone, is directly related to the quality of our input.

Being positive or negative is a choice.

Leadership

Some thoughts on leadership.

With the third Presidential election in the new millennium only a few months away perhaps it is time to assess whether our leaders and would be leaders in politics and even the leader in ourselves, measure to its simple definition.

Leadership is the ability to enthuse, to create, to accomplish goals for the good of the country, the organization, or the business. Inspired leadership is accomplishments for the greater good. Political leaders like to think they are inspired, but too often, “the greater good,” is replaced with partisanship.

Some people strive to be leaders, some are promoted to it, some are elected to it and some have it thrust upon them. There is gentle leadership, ego leadership, benevolent leadership, partisan leadership, inspiring leadership. Whichever one is chosen, by any individual, true leadership is still based on character and character is the outward quality of one’s inner being.

Character is a visible piece of the heart that others see when action, inspiration and difficult choices are required.

In these times of political rhetoric of constant change, of interdependency and minute interconnections, where truly the out-breath of one is the in-breath of another, leaders, in all their forms, need to look for and then act for the greater good.

Anything less diminishes character and keeps leaders and the country from the potential of greatness.